Railroaders

Lackawanna steam engine

Undated image, Port Morris Roundhouse. From the collection of Lois and Scott Beale.

As everywhere in America, the railroads served as a commercial boon for the towns they served-either the commuter train or the freight train. The “Iron Horse” allowed for settlements in the west and wealthy northerners could winter in the south, establishing Florida as the place for “snow birds” centuries ago.

The railroads in Morris County provided shopkeepers with goods, afforded speedy mail delivery and importantly, employment. Railroads served as a companion tool for the Morris Canal; eventually overtaking the canal as a favored transportation mode for ore, goods and people. There are examples of “canalers” trading life on the water for one on the rails.

Within the county itself, the term “railroader” became a catchall phrase for railroad employment, much the same as the term “canaler” had.

It is worth noting for the “railroader” enthusiasts that Morris County boasts its’ own steam locomotive- United States Army Steam Locomotive No. 4039- listed on both the New Jersey State and National Registers of Historic Places. The Locomotive is housed at the Whippany Railway Museum http://www.whippanyrailwaymuseum.net/

This page has a list of “railroaders” known to date. By no means is it complete. Many census records at the turn-of-the-last century include the term “brakeman” at a time when “brakeman” could imply the Morris Canal or the Railroad. Those names have been omitted.

If you have additional information or corrections, please contact Jan Williams: [email protected]

Stations

Boonton

Boonton train trestle, surrounded by trees

The Boonton Train Trestle is a recipient of a Morris County Historic Preservation Grant

Boonton train stationLackawanna hotel/restaurant

Adaptive reuse:

The old station serves as a restaurant.

The railroad company promises to begin the erection of the Boonton deport as soon as the frost is out of the ground.

Dover Iron Era, February 27, 1875

Overhead view of Boonton Station

Boonton Station, June, 1927

Image courtesy of Liberty Historic Railway of New Jersey.

Liberty Historic railway of New Jersey logo

The Liberty Historic Railway of New Jersey organization researches and compiles histories of transportation modes, routes and equipment. In addition, the group provides funding opportunities for restoration/preservation of transportation projects.

Butler

Butler railroad station in the snow

Adaptive reuse:

The Butler Station now serves as the Butler Museum

The Butler Railroad Station was a recipient of a Morris County Historic Preservation Grant

https://butlermuseumnj.org/

Denville

Denville train station Stanley Maciejewski inf ront of the train station

“... my father turns 89 years old next month. I guess the tower was still pretty new when he would take the train up from East Oranges back in the mid-40s. At about the age of 13 or 14, he and his friend Jacky would venture out to the “country” to do a bit of shooting (back when a kid could carry a rifle on their shoulder – and it was good, clean fun).

Growing up in Union, they would take the number 94 Stuyvesant Avenue bus (operated by the Trackless Transit Company). At that time, it cost a nickel and a nickel to get off, since they arrived in a different zone.

Next, it was the DL&W (Delaware Lackawanna & Western) train, aka “delay, linger and wait” to Denville. Once they arrived, he and his buddy would walk to Cooks Pond and scout around the woods for anything that made noise in the leaves. Sometimes, Jacky’s aunt would pick them up at the station, their family had a cabin close to Rock Ridge Lake. They would pick blueberries in an open field nearby – the next morning, she’d make blueberry pancakes – he can remember exactly what they tasted like. My father said those were the really good ol’ days.

~ as told to me by my father, Stanley Maciejewski”

Thank you, Ms. Sandee Weiner, for sharing her father’s recollections. Ms. Weiner’s grandfather, Lewis Maciejewski, worked on the Pennsylvania Railroad for 43 years.

Dover

Former train station, now a real estate office, and an old photo of members of the Veteran Employees Association

Former Central Railroad Station, Dover, 47 North Sussex Street.

Thank you, Lake Hopatcong Historical Museum, image of Central Railroad employees.

Dover Station

Present-day Dover station

The DL&W R.R. Company Lot Orchard Street Cemetery, Dover, New Jersey.

Buried by the Company, Mr. Thomas Whelan who was found along the track by the span bridge on the morning of July 7, has no friends or relatives to be found.

Dover Iron Era, July 14, 1893

Mr. Whelan, a miner by trade, suffered some accident-likely struck by a train. Mr. Whelan’s mention in the Iron Era is the sole, located reference to the DL& W lot.

Orchard Street Cemetery was established in in 1851; well before the railroad made its appearance. Records are missing from the Orchard Street archives; it is unknown when DL&W purchased the lot or where the lot is located.

If you have additional information regarding the DL&W lot, please contact The Orchard Street Gatehouse Historical Association: [email protected]

The Blizzard of March, 1914

Railroad workers in the snow, shoveling out a locomotive

A gang works to shovel out the tracks, where a snow-covered locomotive has fired up.

Thank you Lake Hopatcong Historical Museum for providing the Dover, March, 1914 image.

The Storm! Greatest since the Blizzard of 1888.

The Boonton Weekly Bulletin, March 14, 1914

According to an article in Rutgers NJ Weather Network (Atypical Snow Pattern during March, published April 4, 2014), the 1914 storm took second place for a March snow total. Writing of the snow totals for 2014, author Colleen McHugh compared snow totals in southern and northern portions of the state and provides accumulations for the north at 19.5 to 20.1 inches of snow:

“This past March has also been the only time on record that Southern New Jersey saw significant snowfall while north of that saw close to no accumulation. Second place goes to March 1914, exactly a century ago, when southern New Jersey saw 25.8 inches while central and northern New Jersey saw 19.5 and 20.1 inches. The average snowfall in Southern Jersey (spanning the past 120 snow seasons) is 3.0 inches for the month of March, while averages for Central and Northern Jersey are 4.9 and 6.1 inches, respectively. Accordingly, all three regions experienced unusual snowfall during March, but in completely different ways.”

https://www.njweather.org/content/atypical-snow-pattern-during-march

Hanover

Whippany Railway Museum

Outside of the Whippany Railway Museum Historic Places marker

Steam Locomotive 4039, housed in the Whippany Railway Museum, was the recipient of a Morris County Preservation Grant

http://www.whippanyrailwaymuseum.net/

Lake Hopatcong

Lake Hopatcong Train Station

The train station is unique in Morris County’s transportation history, serving four modes of transportation simultaneously: the train, a trolley line, the Morris Canal and a boating line.

The Lake Hopatcong Train Station was the recipient of a Morris County Historic Preservation Grant

Old photo of the Lake Hopatcong Train Station.

Image courtesy of the Lake Hopatcong Historical Society: https://lakehopatconghistory.com/

Lincoln Park

Lincoln Park station

Madison

Madison station

Millington

Millington station

Morris Plains

Morris Plains station

Morris Township

Convent Station

Convent Station

Mt. Lakes

Mountain Lakes train station, now a restaurant

Adaptive reuse: The former station serves as a restaurant.

Pequannock

Pompton Plains railroad station

The Pompton Plains Railroad Station was the recipient of a Morris County Preservation Grant.

https://www.facebook.com/PequannockHistory/

Port Morris

Old photo of the Port Morris station - a locomotive

The Port Morris Roundhouse

Thank you, Scott and Lois Beale

The Beales have an extensive archive of all things Port Morris and they generously offered to share their collection with interested parties. You may contact them at [email protected]

Washington Township

A portion of the Central Railroad former road bed was the recipient of a Morris County Open Space Trust Fund grant.

Alphabetical List of Railroaders

A

John H. Adams

Morris & Essex

John H. Adams' obituary

Rockaway Record, December 31, 1931

Jacob Allen:

1880, resident of Boonton, works on Railroad.

John Allen:

Born c. 1848 in New Jersey. 1880 Hanover he is described in the census as “on Rail Road” Conductor Allen:

On Friday morning, as Conductor Allen was in the telegraph office at the deopt gutting orders, some scmp imitated his famous "all abord" call and started the train. Fortunately an engine stood ready with steam up, and on this Allen made chase after his fugitive train, and caught up with it at Morris Plains.

Dover Iron Era, February 13, 1875.

Ellis Armstrong:

Civil War veteran. Born in New Jersey c. 1840. He married Francina Haines Lyon on October 29, 1862. He served as a Lieutenant in Co. K 7th NJ.

After the war, the couple relocated to California where the 1910 Vallejo census indicates Armstrong worked as a locomotive engineer.

Ellis Armstrong's wedding notice

Ellis Armstrong died in 1913 and is buried in Yountville Cemetery, Veterans Memorial Grove, Yountville, California.

Jeannette Anderson

Car accountant, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr.  Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

John “Jack” Armstrong:

DL&W

Engineer Jack Armstrong, of the DL and W road, is building for himself a handsome residence in the suburbs of Port Oram.

Dover Iron Era, June 10, 1876

Died in service

John A. Auriemma

WWII. Died in Service. Born in New Jersey September 1, 1915, Mr. Auriemma was a resident of Roxbury in the Port Morris section. A laborer on the DL&W Railroad in civilian life, he served in the United States Army, 741 Railway Battalion. Private Auriemma was killed in France on December 12, 1944 when his Troop Train was bombed. He is buried in Stanhope Union Cemetery.

View our list of those who served in WWII.

B

William Bailey:

Born c. 1857 in New Jersey. In 1880, Boonton, he is a brakeman on the railroad.

Harry S. Banghart:

Station Agent Chatham Depot. From The Chatham Press, February 2, 1901:

Harry S. Banghart of Bloomfield has been appointed night operator and ticket agent at the Chatham depot.

Jack Batson

Brakesman, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

John Beam:

Washington Township. Employed as a “Railroad Boss” by age 31, when he succumbed to typhoid in 1884.

Census record John Beam's obituary

Dover Iron Era, March 8, 1884

Charles M. Beers:

Born c. 1842 in New Jersey. In 1880, he lives in Chester Township and worked as a brakesman on the railroad.

Charles Beers, of Dover, had a thumb cut off while coupling cars last week.

The Morris County Chronicle, December 26, 1879

James Victor Bentley:

Morris & Essex Railroad. Civil War veteran, served with the C, 15th NJ.

Bentley's resignation notice

Dover Iron Era, August 23, 1873

Amos Bird

Amos Bird, conductor of the Boonton gravel train, was struck and instantly killed a little after 3 o'clock Thursday afternoon, a short distance from Ball's Crossing, by the Bevertown run. The engineer of the train that struck him did not know it until he was flagged by Marhsall Price, flagman on Conductor Bird's train, who saw the accident happen. His remains were picked up by his trainc rew and brought to Boonton. Funeral services were held at Netcong on Sunday morning. Internment at Stanhope.

The Morris County Chronicle, October 29, 1887

Charles Bird:

Central Railroad Fireman Son of engineer Jacob Bird. In the 1920 census, he resides in Jefferson with his father.

David Bird:

Conductor David Bird has returned to work again after his fall from the supply chuts, but is not yet as spry as usual.

Dover Iron Era, February 27, 1903

Jacob Bird:

Central Railroad Engineer. Born in New Jersey c. 1858. In the 1920 census, he resides in Jefferson with employment designated as Engineer. His son, Charles, aged 22, resides in the same house and his employment is designated “Fireman Locomotive”.

Engine 346

Undated image Engineer Jacob Bird, taken at Nolan’s Point in engine 346, Lake Hopatcong.

Thank you, Lake Hopatcong Historical Museum

Died in service

Warrenzello Joseph “W. Joseph” Bickert

WWI. Born Pennsylvania, November 3, 1892 his last known residence was Somerville, Somerset County, New Jersey, where he worked as a Signal Man for Central R.R. of New Jersey. Corporal Bickert was Wounded in Action at Bazoches and Succumbed to those wounds August 11, 1918. He is listed on the Dover “Dough Boy” municipal WWI monument as his father and next of kin, Mr. John Bickert, lived on Main Street, Wharton, adjacent to Dover. Corporal Bickert was reportedly buried in an American Cemetery in France. On May 26, 1941 in a memorial service for deceased veterans, Rev. Mr. Pugh led a prayer and read the names of deceased veterans as follows:

“Warrenzello J. Bickert” (The Courier-News, Bridgewater, New Jersey.)

Warrenzello J. Bickert

View our list of WWI soldiers and sailors.

Paul A. Bischer:

WWII. Born in Hoboken, Mr. Bischer resided in Rockaway Township. He worked as a water service mechanic with the Lackawanna Railroad prior to going into the Army. After the war, Mr. Bischer returned to the railroad and remained through all of the railroad mergers. He retired as a Forman for New Jersey Transit in 1987. Mr. Bischer died on May 9, 2003.

View our list of those who served in WWII.

John H. Blowers:

Born Morris County, New Jersey, February of 1830. In 1860, he and his wife, Catherine and daughter Mary are living in Pequannock. 1870 finds the family in Montville, where John’s occupation is described as “Labor”, without Canal connotation. 1880, while remaining in Montville, John is now working for the Railroad. In 1910, he and Catherine are living in Montville.

Levi Bott:

DL&W, Port Morris, Pump House master

Levi's wife and daughter at the Pump House

Levi’s wife Mary Frances Bott and daughter, Jennie, standing in front of the Port Morris Pump House. Water was drawn from the Musconetcong River to supply water for the Port Morris Railyard. The Pump House was located on Center Street and was discontinued in 1924. The 1930 census indicates Levi is still employed at the pump house.

From the collection of Scott and Lois Beale

Nathan “Nate” Bowdish D.L. & W.

Nate Bowdish, the popular engineer of No. 116, was badly burned the other day by the bursting of a flu while running near Stanhope. His fireman was also well peppered, but both are doing well and will be around again shortly.

The Morris County Chronicle, October 29, 1887 The same issue recounts a list of D.L. & W. incidents:

More information about the accident

Conductor Bowers: The conductor’s first name is unknown.

Article about Conductor Bowers

Dover Iron Era, October 9, 1875

William L. Bowlby:

DL&L. Born June, 1851 in New Jersey. On June 21, 1905 per the Dover census, he resides in Dover, employed as a “R.R. Freight Conductor”.

William Bowlby formerly conductor on the Lackawanna ship drill at Dover is now in charge fo the Wharton drill.

Dover Iron Era, June 16, 1905

Henry “Harry” A. Bray: Morristown Ticket Agent

Mr. Bray, the courteous ticket agent at the Morristown depot, will sell excursion tickets to Chicago and return for $18.

The Morris County Chronicle, August 13, 1880

Harry A. Bray, for several years the station agent here, is now permanently located in Philadelphia, as the passenger agent of the Santa Fe R.R.

The Morris County Chronicle, January 12, 1889

Frank Brown:

Born Ireland, c. 1846. In 1880, he lived in Chester Township and worked as a brakesman on the railroad.

Henry Brown

Fireman, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Warren R. Brown:

DL&W

Information about Warren and his mother

Dover Iron Era, July 3, 1903

James Burk:

Born Ireland, c. 1849. In 1880 he lived in Chester Township and worked as a Fireman (one who shovels coal or wood into the fire to power the locomotive) on the railroad.

James Burk: Conductor, The Morris County Railroad

The dead body of Miss Katie Burke, daughter of James Burke, an engineer on the Morris County Railroad, on Wednesday was brought to her late home from the hospital at Morristown.

The Morris County Chronicle, October 15, 1897

George Burnet

Brakeman, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

William G. Burrett:

DL&W Born in New Jersey c. 1847, a resident of Roxbury. Conductor “Burritt” had a run-in with ruffians.

Article about the run-in

Dover Iron Era, January 7, 1882

C

George Campfield:

Laborer, Ogden Mine Railroad

Article about Campfield's death

Dover Iron Era, May 4, 1872

Robert Cantrell: aka Contrell

WWI veteran. Born in Newark, New Jersey, April 24, 1893, Mr. Cantrell made Denville his hometown for decades. When he registered for the WW draft, he was employed by DL&W R.R. Co. in Dover, Morris County, New Jersey as a cashier. Mr. Cantrell is residing in Mt. Tabor*. The draft registration card indicates “CA” or Class A (very fit for military service.) 1920 finds him safely back from the war, and residing in Denville with his parents and his wife, Effie, he is unemployed. On March 14, 1929, Robert is listed as an Alternate when the first Mount Tabor Fire Department sent a delegation to the North Jersey Volunteer Firemen’s Association. By 1930, he resides in Denville, working as an Agent for the Tram Railroad in Denville. WW veteran is indicated on the census. By the time of the “Old Man’s Draft” he remains a “train man” working for Delaware, Lackawanna & Western (DL&W) RR. Co, on Orchard Street, in Dover. Mr. Cantrell died April 16, 1957 and was buried in the First Presbyterian Cemetery, Rockaway Borough. He is remembered on the Rockaway-Rockaway Township-Denville World War Memorial.

Martin Carberry, Jr.:

Born c. 1897 in New Jersey, his last known residence was Dover. Station agent employee. Per an article in The Rockaway Record, December 27, 1917 edition (excerpt below), the 20 year old young man met with an accident while handing a telegraph to a railroad crew member on an eastbound train. He died 2 hours after the accident. Martin’s father had died a week earlier in a hydraulic plant accident.

Article about Carberry's death

James Carrol:

Born Ireland October, 1849 (immigrated to the United States the same year). In 1900, he resides in Boonton Township and occupation is R.R. engineer.

Lawrence Carrol:

In 1880, he lives in Boonton and Works on the Railroad.

Robert H. Carter:

DL&W Engineer

Some of the friends of Engineer Carter of the Dover Express...substantially shown their regard for him by the presentation of a handsome seal-skin cap.

Dover Iron Era, December 20, 1873

Article

Dover Iron Era, July 8, 1876

Carter's obituary

Dover Iron Era, March 4, 1882

Peter Cavanaugh:

Cavanaugh's obituary

Dover Iron Era, November 13, 1880

Isaac Chamberlain:

Born c. 1853 in New Jersey, in 1880, he lives in Boonton and works as a Brakeman on the railroad.

Charles Cisco:

Born New Jersey, February, c. 1877. In the 1900 Rockaway Township census, he and his brother, Homer, are laborers on the R.R.. By 1909, Charles is the baggage master.

Mr. Chas. Cisco our station baggagoman is suffering with muscular Rheumatism in the left knee. The swelling was so great and the pain so intense that he was compelled to remain at home Monday.

Rockaway Record, April 22, 1909.

Homer Cisco:

Born New Jersey, June, c. 1879. In the 1900 Rockaway Township census, he and his brother, Charles, are laborers on the R.R.

William V. Conover:

Born c. 1850 in New Jersey, a resident of Boonton, Mr. Conover worked as a Railroad Conductor in 1880, per census information. He is noted in 1876 with the same position.

Conductor Holmes of the Hcakettstown...has been sick for some time. Conductor George of the Dover Express is for the present running the train, and Conductor Conover is in charge of the Dover Express.

Dover Iron Era, June 3, 1876

John Cook:

DL&W

Four Lackawannians Work 188 Years John Cook took service as a laborer at Denville in 1880, was made a section forman 10 years later and served a total of 51 years and 8 months.

Rockaway Record, December 3, 1931

Roger Cozart

Brakeman, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

D

Phil Dahill

Machinist, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Henry Melbourn Dalrymple:

Civil War veteran.

Dalrympe's obituary

Dover Iron Era, February 5, 1904

Joe Dandino

Brakeman, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

John Deremer

Engineer, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

William H. Dillhy:

In 1900, he boards in Mendham. His occupation is given as Fireman on Railroad.

Conductor W.H. Dillhy, of the Rockaway Valley R.R. passenger service, while running his train through Mendham saw the home of David Farley in flames. By promptly stopping and sending a couple of his assistants to help, the fire was put out.

Dover Iron Era, May 12, 1905

Fredrick Doland:

Born c. 1854 in New Jersey, in 1880 as a resident of Chester Township, he worked as a railroad clerk.

Margaret Dooling

Bookkeeper, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Manning Drake:

Rail yard clerk. Born c. 1876, New Jersey

Manning Drake in front of the Port Morris Yard

Mr. Drake is 4th from the left. The 5th man is identified as Frank McDede. Likely this is Dr. Frank F. McDede.

Transfer at Port Morris Yard, DL&W, 1875 image from the collection of Scott and Lois Beale

William M. Duckworth:

Duckworth's obituary

Dover Iron Era, November 7, 1902

E

Charles F. Edsall:

Charles F. Edsell, formerly conductor on train No. 25 and 26, and well known to many Boonton commuters, was buried from his late home at Morristown on Tuesday. Since leaving the railroad he has resided in Morristown, being engaged in the auto accessory business.

The Boonton Weekly Bulletin, May 23, 1918

Frank B. Eldridge:

Frank Eldridge returns to the Chester House

Dover Iron Era, April 3, 1875

John R. English:

1880 Boonton, he works as a railroad engineer.

Oscar Erickson

Master Mechanic, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

F

Sebastiano Falco:

Born January 20, 1892 in Marigliano, Italy, he was a resident of Madison at the time of the WWI Draft Registration. Mr. Falco gives his employment as “Railroader”.

Patrick Farrell:

Farrell's obituary

Dover Iron Era, June 13, 1890

Robert Dumont Foote:

Mr. Foote died in 1924 and was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Morristown.

Foote's obituary

Rockaway Record, March 6, 1913

Theodore Ford:

Baggage Master at Dover.

The reports of Baggage-master Ford of the Lackawanna station shows that during the month of July 5551 pieces of luggage were handled by himself and assistants. The greatest number of pieces handled on any one day were handled July 2. On this day 471 pieces were "smashed."

Dover Iron Era, August 5, 1904

Mrs. Theodore Ford's obituary

Rockaway Record, February 23, 1928

G

James Gallagher:

Gallagher's obituary

Dover Iron Era, March 4, 1904

Frank A. Garland:

Lackawanna. In 1880, Boonton, he is a Fireman on Locomotive.

Frank Garrison:

Frank Garrison started working on the railroad as a laborer at Paterson in 1881 and was made section foreman in 1893. He served 50 years and 8 months, had charge of the section at Montville of late and resides at 134 Division St., Boonton.

Rockaway Record, December 3, 1931

Tommy Gee

Brakeman, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

John W. Gosher:

Born c. 1833 in New Jersey, in 1880, Mr. Gosher is a resident of Chester Township. In 1880 he was employed as a railroad clerk.

Bob Griffith

Freight agent, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Frank J. Griffith:

Morris & Essex

Conductor Griffith of the Dover Express has been presented with a handsome seal skin cap by the commuters on his train.

Dover Iron Era, November 29, 1873

Griffith was presented with a gold watch from commuters

Dover Iron Era, December 27, 1873

Thursday morning at about nine o clock, a train on the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad, and of the Morris and Essex Division, ran off the line...one mile north of Newark. The locomotive and two cars jumped the track and two cars remained on it. The Dover Express, coming behind, saw the wrecked train in time to prevent a collission. Mr. Frank Griffith, conductor of the Dover Express, took all the passengers off the wrecked train, and bucking his train, got on the opposit track, and, preceded by a flagman as far as Newark, arrived in Hoboken but ten minutes later than his regular time.

Dover Iron Era, January 23, 1875

Griffith presented with a pipe as a gift

Dover Iron Era, October 2, 1875

Griffith participates in the Newton fireman's parade

Dover Iron Era, October 2, 1875

Anton Gunther:

WWI veteran. Born Mt. Olive December 26, 1894; last known residence Maplewood, Essex County, N.J. At the time of the draft registration, Mr. Gunther was living in Dover, working as a construction engineer for the DL&W Railroad. Mr. Gunther enlisted September 19, 1917 and served as a Corporal in the 303rd Engineers. Mr. Gunther died October 29, 1936 after suffering an accidental fall. He was buried in Millbrook Methodist Cemetery, Randolph.

View our list of WWI soldiers and sailors.

H

William Hagerman:

Born in Michigan, he served as Dover’s Station Agent.

Hagerman's census entry

1870 Census, Randolph

Mr. W.J.R. Hagerman, station agent, has...the Orchard street railroad crossing repair...in an excellent manner.

Dover Iron Era, April 17, 1875

Article, "A Model Improvement"

Dover Iron Era, September 9, 1876

Col. B. F. Haines:

Yardmaster, DL&W, Port Morris

Haines in front of the Port Morris station

Col. Haines is 7th from the left

Transfer at Port Morris Yard, DL&W, 1875 mage from the collection of Scott and Lois Beale

John Hall:

DL&W. Denville. Civil War veteran. He did recover fully from the accident noted in 1873 and had a long career as a “Railroader”.

Article about Hall's accident

Dover Iron Era, June 28, 1873 The Boonton Times and The Boonton Weekly Bulletin March 6, 1923

John Hall is honored by the Exchange Club

The Morris County Chronicle, December 29, 1914 Rockaway Record, May 26, 1932

Charles Hannaka:

Lackawanna

Hannaka's obituary

Dover Iron Era, October 20, 1905

John Hatheway:

Born August 5, 1893 at Echo Lake, Passaic County, New Jersey. His last known Residence was Riverdale, Morris County, New Jersey where he worked for the Susquehanna Railroad. His service in WWI is unknown, as well as his death date and burial location. Mr. Hatheway is remembered on the Riverdale World War I Memorial.

View our list of WWI soldiers and sailors.

Samuel D. Harris:

Harris' obituary

The Boonton Weekly Bulletin November 29, 1883.

Albert Hoffman:

Lackawanna

Hoffman surprised by friends for his birthday; Hoddman involved in a train accident

Dover Iron Era, January 23, 1903; Dover Iron Era, February 20, 1903

D.H. Hicks:

Madison resident. Freight Agent, DL& W

D.H. Hicks, who for 40 years has held the position of freight agent at the Lackawanna station, will retire on Apil 1st, and remove to Newark. Mr. Hicks has long been a respected resident of the community, and his removal is to be regretted.

The Morris County Chronicle, March 25, 1898

Jacob H. Hoffman:

Civil War veteran. Born in New Jersey c. 1833, on September 1, 1863, Mr. Hoffman enlisted in the New Jersey 2nd Cavalry. First Lt. Hoffman was shot in the head, leg and hand, and was discharged November 1, 1865. Residing in Boonton, Mr. Hoffman worked as a Brakeman on the DL&W Railroad in 1880. He served as the Post Master, as well, until his death December 19, 1895.

Mr. Hoffman is buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Boonton.

Alex Hominick

Groundskeeper, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Joseph Homler:

Born New Jersey c. 1843, Mr. Homler was a resident of Chester Township in 1880. He was employed as a Railroad Engineer.

Edward Hopler:

Edward Hopler, formerly an employee at the Lackawanna feight station at this place, and a resident of Dover from boyhood, has been made station agent at Wharton.

Dover Iron Era, August 5, 1904

Warren Hopler:

In 1910, Warren Hopler is an Engineer on the railroad.

Wheeler Hopler:

Wheeler and Warren Hopler, of Franklin, have accepted positions as firemen on the main line of the Central Railroad.

Rockaway Record, January 18, 1900

John Hotten:

Mt. Hope Railroad

John Hotten train accident report

Dover Iron Era, June 19, 1875

H. B. Housel:

Lackawanna

Housel promoted in Morris Plains

The Bernardsville News, August 28, 1903

William Huff

Railroad Notes: Engineer William Huff of Port Morris is now running the Dover Express.

The Morris County Chronicle, February 18, 1898

John B. Huher:

Mr. Huher’s birth place, residence (likely Port Morris) and railroad position are unknown. Noted on the back of the image is a lineage.

Huber in front of a locomotive engine Handwritten family free

From the collection of Scott and Lois Beale

Charles Hulme

Morris & Essex

Article about Hulme

Dover Iron Era, June 17, 1876

The report that Hulme had resigned his position is untrue, as is the statement about his having consumption. He is rapidly recovering and will on Monday assume again his accusomed place on the road.

Dover Iron Era, June 24, 1876

Conductor Charles Hulme is sick at his home in Hackettstown.

The Morris County Chronicle, February 27, 1880

Hulme's obituary

Dover Iron Era, February 25, 1882

Peter A. Hummer:

Telegraph operator DL&W Port Morris yard. Born c. 1863 in New Jersey.

Hummer in front of Port Morris station

Mr. Hummer is 6th from the left

Transfer at Port Morris Yard, DL&W, 1875 mage from the collection of Scott and Lois Beale

Mr. Hummer had a long career as a telegraph operator. This is an image of the 1910 census for Netcong, 35 years after the Beale image:

Hummer census statement

The following article from The Morris County Chronicle, September 7, 1878, demonstrates the crucial position of telegraph operators, both for the railroad needs and in times of crisis:

The D. L. & W. telegraph operators have received dispatches from their brother operatiors in the yellow fever districts in the South, asking aid for their wives and families. We are glad tos tate there is a hearty response to these sad appeals.

Richard A. Hunt:

A Pennsylvania native, born c. 1851, Mr. Hunt resided in Hanover in 1880 and was employed as a Ticket Agent.

The family of Richard Hunt, station agent at Morris Plains, has again been afflicted by the loss of one of their number, the second that has died of diptheria within a few weeks.

Dover Iron Era, March 25, 1882

J

Edward E. Jackson:

Jackson's obituary

Dover Iron Era, May 27, 1898

Mauritius Jensen

Auditor, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Edward Johnson:

Central Railroad

Edward Johnson, of Budd Lake, has secured the position of operator at the Central Railroad station in this borough. Mr. Johnson only recently returned from the Phillipine Islands, where he was a sergeant in Uncle Sam's employ, being detailed as an operator.

Dover Iron Era, October 17, 1902

Jim Jones

Jim was a conductor, retired back in the 90s and has since passed away - and a WW2 vet. He way in the Navy, in the Pacific and was on two different ships that were torpedoed and sunk and he survived both disasters.  Jim lived in Denville and later Ironia and moved to Florida after he retired.

Thank you, Mr. Charles King, for providing information for Conductor Jones

Ken Jones

Brakeman, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Ted Jones

Ted Jones of Denville was an Engineer, pictured here rolling along in Denville. The photograph was given by his son, Jim-another railroader-to his friend, Mr. Charles King. Mr. King shared the fate of No. 1239:

DL&W 1239, built 1918 by American Locomotive Co. Schenectady Works  2-8-0 Baker valve gear scrapped 1951.

DL&W 1239.jpg

K

Died in service denotes Killed in Action or Died in Service

Frank Kault:

Rockaway Valley Railroad

Mr. and mrs. Frank Kault, of Morristown, were guests at Lyon's Hotel the first of the week. Mr. Kaultt is superintendent of the Rockaway Valley railroad.

The Bernardsville News, January 16, 1903

The Rockaway Valley Railroad was constructed c. 1888 for shipping peaches. The rail-line was nicknamed “The Rock-A-Bye Baby” ceased operations in 1913.

The Rock-A-Bye Baby. A history of the Rockaway Valley Railroad, Thomas T. Taber III, 1972

Albert Kearns:

Central RR

Kearns' obituary

Rockaway Record, January 24, 1929

Died in service

Michael Kedzuf

WWI. Born Rockaway Township, in the Hibernia section, September 18, 1892. His last known residence was Wharton, where he was a Track Foreman for Wharton and Northern Railroad. Mr. Kedzuf was inducted at Dover, Morris County, N.J. on November 19, 1917. A Private attached to the 7th Infantry, 3rd Division, he served over-seas from April 7, 1918. Private Kedzuf was Killed in he of the Missing Aisne-Marne American Cemetery and he is listed on the WWI Doughboy Monument, Dover, New Jersey.

View our list of WWI soldiers and sailors.

Thomas Keenan:

Engineer Keenan’s birth date, place and residence is unknown, however, the Dover Iron Era, July 8, 1876 edition provides a glimpse of his patriotism during the Centennial:

Engineer Tom Keenan showed his colors on his locomotive, which is labeled "Hold the Fort." Tom Kenan, the engineer orator, lectured to a full house in Dover on Wednesday evening.

The Morris County Chronicle, March 10, 1882

Roy Everette Kellam:

Engineer. Port Morris. Engineer Kellam was born May 19, 1880 and worked for the DL&W Railroad.

Kellem on engine 343 at Port Morris

From the collection of Scott and Lois Beale

Rudy Kelich

Brakeman, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Thomas Kelly:

Born Ireland c. 1846. In 1880, he works for the railroad, per the census.

Andrew Kerr:

Born Scotland, c. 1841. Railroad Employee. Resided in Hanover. Died June 2, 1883.

Henry “Heinie” F. Keyes

Conductor, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Edward King:

Mr. Ed King, the well-known engineer, was driving through town with his family last Saturday evening, when, as he was turning the corner of Blackwell and Morris streets, the rear seat of the agon tipped backwards, throwing Mrs. King and her three children violently to the ground. Fortunately, none were seriously injured.

Dover Iron Era, August 12, 1876

King's obituary, 1

King's obituary, 2

King's obituary, 3

Dover Iron Era, October 7, 1898

August Kneudes:

Born Germany, c. 1865, he immigrated to the United States in 1888. In 1900, he resides in Boonton Township and is a Fireman on the R.R.

William Kneudes:

Son of August, William was born in New Jersey, 1898. In 1900, he resides in Boonton Township and is a Forman in the R.R. Shop.

L

Russell Lawrence:

Engineer, Port Morris

Russel Laurence

1926

From the collection of Scott and Lois Beale

Lawrence's father

Engineer Lawrence’s father, Alex, was the “Meat Man”.

L.M. Leek:

Madison resident. Freight agent, DL&W. Replaced Mr. Hicks at his retirement.

L. M. Leek, who resides on Harrison street, this city, has received the appointment of freight agent at the Madison deport, to succeed D. H. Hicks, resigned. Mr. Leek has assisted at the office for 8 years past.

George S. Lyon:

Born New Jersey in 1860. In 1900, he resides in Boonton Township and is a RR Yard Master.

M

Frank Marger:

Lackawanna.

Frank Marger, the Lackawanna gateman at the Warren street crossing, on Tuesday saved the mother of Mrs. James Row from death beneath the wheels of a Lackawanna excursion train.

Dover Iron Era, July 24, 1903

Theodore Martin:

Born c. 1870 in New Jersey. In 1900, he is working a Brakesman on the rail road, per the Rockaway Township census. He lives with his mother, Mary.

Theo Martin has been compelled to lay aside railroad duties for a few days owing to illness.

Rockaway Record, March 15, 1900

Charles Mase:

Born c. 1885, New Jersey. In the 1920 Rockaway census, he is described as “Laborer on Steam Railway”.

Mase in front of Port Morris station

Mr. Charles Mase is 1st from the left. Next to him his Al Mase, his relationship to Charles and the railroad, if any, is unknown.

Transfer at Port Morris Yard, DL&W, 1875 mage from the collection of Scott and Lois Beale

Nelson Maxwell:

Born c. 1837 in New Jersey in 1880, he lists his employment as “On Rail Road”. He and his wife, Jane, are residents of Hanover.

Richard W. McEwan, Jr.

President, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Michael McGrath:

McGrath's obituary

Frank McKenna

Brakeman, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

William Merwin:

Lackawanna.

Merwin's obituary

Dover Iron Era, May 20, 1904

Daniel J. McDede:

We learn as we go to press that Daniel J. McDede, veteran railroader and a man of many experiences and wide knowledge, died recently at his home at South Orange. .McDede was at one time a writer for this paper over the signature of "D. J." and as such was much quoted.

Dover Iron Era, February 5, 1904

James McNeil:

Born 1828 in Ireland, Mr. McNeil, a resident of Hanover in 1880, works on section of railroad tracks.

Robert L. McNeil:

Mt. Hope Railroad

Mr. Michael McNeil, a former conductor on the Mt. Hope railroad has taken the Port Oram bakery, and has opened it in an excellent manner.

Dover Iron Era, March 13, 1875.

The correction:

It is Mr. Robert L. McNeil and not Michael McNeill, who has taken the Port Oram bakery.

Dover Iron Era, March 20, 1875

Harold Meslar

Engineer, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Ira V. Meslar

Superintendent, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Thomas Meslar

Engineer, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Charles Ernest Mill:

Station agent at Dover.

C. Ernest Mill, of South Morris street, has returned from a visit to Los Angeles, Cal., where he attended the Annual Convention of Railroad Officials.

Rockaway Record, November 4, 1926

Elijah Miller:

Per the 1900 census, Rockaway Township, Elijah is employed as a railroad gate keeper.

Frank Miller:

See Various section below re: articles noting the development of the Longwood Valley RR

Frank Miller has been appointed agent of the new Longwood Valley road at German Valley.

Dover Iron Era, July 29, 1876

George R. Miller:

Born 1833 in New Jersey. In the 1880 Rockaway Township Census, Mr. Miller is described as “RR Supt.”

Jerry Miller

Fireman, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

William Miller:

The father of Elijah, resides with his son in 1900. William is also employed as a railroad gate keeper.

Charles Morgan:

In the 1880, he is listed as the R.R. Baggage Master.

Mrs. catharine Morgan's obituary

Rockaway Record, February 8, 1900

Arthur G. Morris:

Lackawanna Station, Chatham

Arthur G. Morris has been appointed night operator at the Lackawanna station at Chatham.

Dover Iron Era, January 23, 1903

N

George B. Neafie:

Born June, 1863 in New Jersey, in 1900 he resides in Boonton Township. Occupation, Engineer on RR.

William C. Newman:

Lackawanna.

William C. Newman, fifty-seven years old, died Sunday at his home. 126 North Sussex street. Dover, after an Illness of several years. A former conductor, he was pensioned three years ago by the Lackawanna Ra—mat Funeral services were held at 210 Thursday at his home. Besides his wile. Mrs. Della Newman. he is survived by two (Maidens. Mrs Harold Staten, of Brooklyn. and Mrs. John Russell, of Rockaway. and three sons. Ernest, at home; Carl. of Dover, and Raymond, of Mine Hill. He was a member of Dover Lodge of Moose • and of the Brotherhood of Railway ' Conductors.

Rockaway Record, August 13, 1931

D. Morris Nichols:

Served as Mayor of Rockaway Borough, Morris County Traction Co.

Portrait of Nichols; his obituary

Rockaway Record, October 29, 1931

Dover's First Trolley Brings Large Improvements

The Dover Iron Era, July 8, 1904

In a show of civic pride, both the first Morris Canal boat and the first trolley were named “The Dover”.

In front of trolly car 312

Undated photo, unidentified crew, Morris County Traction Co., taken in Dover.

Morris County Traction Co. Terminal

The Morris County Traction Co. Terminal. The building still stands and serves as the Lakeland Bus service terminal in Dover.

Thank you Lake Hopatcong Historical Museum

O

William O’Brian:

Born c. 1857 New Jersey, in 1880, Mr. O’Brian is employed as a “Railroad boss”. He is a resident of Chester Township.

Owen O’Neil:

Gateman DL&W. The Chatham Press, May 2, 1903.

O'Neil obituary

P

Louis Palmer:

WWI. Birth place unknown, birth date August 12, 1896. Last known residence, Madison where he worked as a laborer on the DL&W Railroad. When Mr. Palmer enlisted on April 26, 1917, he had previous experience in Madison’s Home Defense. Private, attached to the 147th Infantry, he returned to Madison, passing away November 15, 1933. Mr. Palmer was buried November 18 in St. Vincent’s Cemetery.

View our list of WWI soldiers and sailors.

John D. Pedrick:

Born in Pennsylvania, Mr. Pedrick was a resident of Dover. He lived on Chrystal Street, the house under construction in 1882:

Engineer John pedrick is about building a large and fine new double house on Chrystal street. Mr. Oliver Freeman has the contract for the work.

Dover Iron Era, March 25, 1882

The 1910 census indicates he is an Engineer for a Locomotive. Mr. Pedrick died in 1926 and was buried in Orchard Street Cemetery, Dover.

Elmer Peer:

DL&W

Four lackawannians Work 188 years Elmer Peer began working on the railroad in 1877 as a laborer at Montville, N.J. Five years later he was made a brakeman and ran on the trains for 17 years, For 32 years he has been a section foreman and of late years in charge of an extra gang. His term of service was 54 years and 8 months. He resides at 412 Old Boonton Road, Boonton.

Rockaway Record, December 3, 1931

Jacob Peer:

DL&W

Peer's obituary

Dover Iron Era, November 25, 1898

Marenus Peer:

Civil War. Born New Jersey, c. 1844. On June 21, 1862, Marenus Peer enlisted at Washington, D.C. into the 2nd D.C. Infantry. He was discharged September 12, 1865 at Alexandria, Virginia. Mr. Peer was a member of the U. S. Grant Post No. 117 (The Chatham Press, December 13, 1901 G.A.R. Elect Officers.) In 1870, he resides in Rockaway Township working as a boatman on the Morris Canal. Mr. Peer relocated to Coming, New York to work for the Rail Road (per his admission to disabled veterans home in Bath, New York.) An email received March 13, 2017 from Ms. Elizabeth Bolt (Sgt. Peer’s 3rd Great Granddaughter) shed light on his later years and burial location. After suffering paralytic strokes a few years prior, Marenus died March 29, 1922. He was buried in Phoenix Cemetery, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. An article below from The Chatham Press, November 21, 1903 sheds light on Mr. Peer’s management style.

The Italian laborers employed on the section gang of the Lackawanna Railroad, which takes care of the track near Chatham, went on a strike Saturday because of the discharge of two of their number. Marenus Peer, the boss, settled the matter by taking back those discharged, and all the men went back to work.

View Employees of the Morris Canal..

Tom Peer

Brakesman, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Tom Peterson

Assistant agent, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

C. E. Pettit

Auditor, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

John J. Pierce:

Conductor John Pierce of Orchard street was called to Hackettstown last Wednesday week on account of the death of his brother, Marcus, aged 35 years, The funeral services were held Saturday.

Dover Advance, April 30, 1903

Ervin Post:

WWI veteran. Born March 21, 1896 in Beaver Lake, Sussex County, New Jersey; last known residence was the Port Morris section of Roxbury. Mr. Post worked as a conductor on a steam railroad. His service is unknown, he is listed as WW veteran on the 1930s census. Mr. Post’s death date and burial location are unknown.

View our list of WWI soldiers and sailors.

Douglass Price:

Born New Jersey, c. 1858. A Boonton resident in 1880, he is employed as a brakeman on the railroad.

Marshall Price:

Amos Bird, conductor of the Boonton gravel train, was struck and instantly killed a little after 3 o'clock Thursday afternoon, a short distance from Ball's Crossing, by the Bevertown run. The engineer of the train that struck him did not know it until he was flagged by Marshall Price, flagman on Conductor Bird's train, who saw the accident happen. His remains were picked up by his train crew and brought to Boonton. Funeral services were held at Netcong on Sunday morning. Interment at Stanhope.

The Morris County Chronicle, October 29, 1897

Theresa Price

Clerk, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Q

Philip Leo Quinn:

WWI veteran. Born in Netcong, New Jersey on April 18, 1896. He remained a life-long resident, and worked as a brakeman, then as a Conductor on the DL&W Railroad. His service is unknown. Mr. Quinn returned to Netcong. He died May 9, 1961 and is buried in Holy Rood Cemetery.

View our list of WWI soldiers and sailors.

R

William H. Rarick:

Civil War veteran. DL&W

Rarick's obituary

Dover Iron Era, December 2, 1904

Martin Angelo Richard:

WWI veteran. A native of Tucker, Fairfax County, West Virginia, born April 3, 1891. Registering for the draft in West Virginia, Mr. Richard listed his occupation as Coal Miner for Davis Coal & Coke. He served as a Private with the 71st Infantry. Relocating to Boonton, Mr. Richard worked on the DL&W Railroad. Mr. Richard died October 16, 1953 and was buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Boonton.

View our list of WWI soldiers and sailors.

John Ridge:

Born in New Jersey c. 1874-75, John married Emma Cook in 1895. Serving as a night watchman at the Morristown, he faced danger from a robbery; the specifics published in the Rockaway Record, November 4, 1926 edition. Mr. Ridge continued working for the railroad, as the 1930 census for Morristown indicates Baggage Master, R.R. as his occupation.

Railroad Station at Morristown Robbed

John Ridner:

Labors on the railroad in 1900 -1920, per Rockaway Township census.

Horse for sale - Sorrel, sound and kind, 9 years old this spring, a good road horse. Apply to John Ridner, Teabo Mine.

Dover Iron Era, March 6, 1903

James H. Riley:

DL&W Gate Tender

James a Riley, a former resident of Dover, died at his home in Boonton early on Saturday morning, Juno 17, after a long illness. He was born in Ireland sixty-one years ago and Caine to this country when shout twelve years old, Re worked for the Delaware, Lackawanna and western Rail-road Company for forty-two years, the last thirteen of which he was a gate tender in Boonton, having moved from Dover to Boon-ton in 1885. He married Ellen Foley, daughter of Mr. and Mm. John Foley, of Boonton. For the past eighteen years he had been a sufferer from rheumatism. The fu-eral services were hold on Tuesday morning with high requiem mum. Interment was made in At Mary's cemetery, Boonton. His wife, Mrs. Ellen Riley; two daughters, Miss Maggio Riley and Miss Catherine Riley; two sons, Harry and William Riley, and four sisters, Mrs. Mary Ann ...Miss Jennie Riley, Miss Catherine Riley and Mrs. Alice Maguire, survive him.

Dover Iron Era, June 23, 1899

Howard Roff

Fireman, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Fred Rommiehs

Shop man, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Auguste Jaques Rossi:

Born in France and his early career was as a Civil Engineer. It is likely he went by the name “Andrew J.” and was responsible for laying out Holy Rood Cemetery in Morristown. He surveyed and laid out the DL&W railroad. Shortly after, he became a noted chemist at the Boonton Iron Works.

Mr. Andrew Rossi, of Dover, has taken the contract to lay out the Catholic Cemetery at Morristown and began the work this week.

Dover Iron Era, November 20, 1875

Andrew Rush:

Born Wurtenburgh, Germany, c. 1832. In 1860, Mr. Rush is a boatman on the Morris Canal, living in Roxbury. By 1870, remaining in Roxbury, Mr. Rush has become a Rail Road laborer.

View Employees of the Morris Canal.

Halmagh “Ham” Ryerson

Conductor, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

S

Raymond J. Sampson:

WWI. Born in New Jersey, November 4, 1897 to parents Patrick and Elizabeth. Mr. Sampson appears to have lived in Butler his entire life. Mr. Sampson’s service is unknown, but he was welcomed home in the pamphlet dated September 20, 1919 Program of Patriotic Demonstration, Butler and Bloomingdale Veterans of the World War Homecoming. Additionally, Mr. Sampson was identified in the 1930 Butler census as a WW veteran. In his civilian life, Mr. Sampson worked as an accountant for the Railroad. His date of death and place of burial are unknown.

View our list of WWI soldiers and sailors.

David "Dave" Sanderson:

Conductor. Born c. 1845, he was a resident of Morris Township and Morristown.

The Morris County Chronicle, March 25, 1898

Marshall Sayre

Conductor Marshall Sayre, of the Chester Branch, has been confined to his home in Chester during the past week by a severe attach of the grip.

Dover Iron Era, January 13, 1899.

Reuben Schaeffer:

Night watchman at the Engine House in Dover. Mr. Schaeffer’s name and employment was discovered in the Iron Era, August 4, 1877 edition; an edition filled with news regarding an ongoing railroad strike.

James W. Schappell:

James W. Schappell, who came herw in the early seventies from the Reading Railroad to run on the M. & E. Railroad, and who has thus been in the place over thirty years, moved his goods last week and went with his wife to Barnesville, Schuylkill county, Pa., where one of his daughters, and the sister of his wife live, expecting to spend the balance of his days with them. Mr. Schappell was an earnest Christian worker and one of the founders of the Sunday school and church here and will be missed in the ranks here, where he has so long been active.

Dover Iron Era, September 29, 1905

A.S. Searfoss:

Ticket Agent.

Nearly Lost His Life. On Monday afternoon Wm. A. Karr. of Hibernia. came near losing his life at the Lackawanna station here. As the 2 : 69 train was moving out ho attempted to board it and as he grabbed the hand rail he slipped between the coaches. A. S. Searfoss, the ticket agent, WU on the platform at the time and caught him and held him up until the train stopped, then succeeded in helping him from his perilous position. All who witnessed the accident expected to see the man ground beneath the wheels.

Rockaway Record, June 21, 1900

William Shannon:

Shannon's obituary

Rockaway Record, November 12, 1931

Charles Sharer:

Mr. Sharer went back to “canaling”. In 1894, he resided in Netcong. The Iron Era reports that “Brakeman Charles Sherer and his two brothers, who were brakemen also, have gone boating. I do not know whether railroading was too slow for them or not, but I do know that some of our best railroad men graduate on the canal and preferred a locomotive to a canal mule.”

View Employees of the Morris Canal.

Edward Shipman:

Ticket agent in Chatham. From The Chatham Press, December 20, 1902 edition

Edward S. Shipman, ticket agent at the Chatham station, has tendered his resignation to the Lackawanna Railroad, in order to accept a position with the Central Railroad at Bayonne.

Frederick H. Slaght:

Brakes on Plane Car. Son of Foreman “J.W.” Slaght, Frederick was born in New Jersey, c. 1860. By the census records, Frederick last worked on the canal in 1880. By 1930, he is a retired Railroad employee, living in Roxbury.

Fred H. Smith:

Smith's obituary

Dover Iron Era, September 16, 1904

John Condit “J. Condit” Smith:

Civil War veteran.

J. Condit Smith's obituary

The Boonton Weekly Bulletin, November 15, 1883

Pierson Smith:

Born c. 1828 in New Jersey. In 1880, he is a resident of Hanover and works on railroad track.

David Space:

Civil War veteran. Mr. Space had lost a leg in the war. He ran a stand at the Dover depot for several years.

The Iron era may be found every Saturday morning at Space's refreshment stand, in the Depot.

Dover Iron Era, December 18, 1875

Guissippi Sparrone:

aka Guissippi Sparone; aka Joseph Sparrone; aka Joseph Sperone (1940); aka Joe Spiron (1942); aka Joe Spirone (1967). WWI

Born in Casola, Ceasarte, Italy on September 2, 1886. Mr. Sparrone emigrated to the United States in 1906. The WW I draft registration has him working as a Laborer on the DL& W Railroad and residing in Rockaway Borough. The card indicates previous military training for 3 years, serving in the 54th Italian Regiment. By the 1942 draft registration, lives on Maple Avenue with his wife, Rose. He works for Michael Clemens. He signs his name as “Joe”. He died in July of 1967. His service in WW I and his burial place are unknown. Mr. Sparone is remembered on the Rockaway- Rockaway Township-Denville World War Memorial.

View our list of WWI soldiers and sailors.

Peter Paul Stefanic, Jr

WWI

A first-generation American, Peter was born in Montville, March 16, 1891. Peter, Sr. and his wife Katheryn emigrated from Czechoslovakia* in 1885. Per the draft registration, Peter, Jr. was a painter, employed by the Delaware Lackawanna Railroad. In 1930, the Stefanic household resides in Rockaway Township, where Peter, Jr. is indicated as a WW veteran, employed as a house painter. Peter married Mary, the two are listed in the 1940 census for Rockaway Township. By the “Old Man’s Draft”, in 1942, Mr. Stefanic works at Jackson Lumber, listed as self-employed, living on Mt. Hope Avenue. According to the Rockaway Borough Historical Committee, the lumberyard company’s footprint remains visible in the Borough’s public works yard. Mr. Stefanic died in October of 1985. His burial location is unknown. Peter Paul Stefanic is remembered on the Rockaway-Rockaway Township-Denville World War Memorial. *Czechoslovakia did not exist as a country until 1918. Reading the 1930 census indicates that Peter, Sr. and Katheryn spoke Slovak. This provides a key for further researching of the Stefanic family or Slovenian history in Morris County.

View our list of WWI soldiers and sailors.

Joseph Steventon:

Civil War veteran

Mr. Steventon was born in Pennsylvania c. 1838.

During the Civil War, he was a Bugler with Co. B, 1st NJ Lt. Art; serving from September, 1861 to September, 1864 per the Veterans census of 1890.

An effort was made last Thursday night to break into the station of the Lackawanna Railroad. A pane of glass in a window in the baggage-room had been cut out, but the thief was evidently frightened away by Night Watchman Joseph Steventon.

Rockaway Record, May 24, 1900

William C. Sprigg:

Baggage master in Dover. Announcement of his wedding to Jeannie Sharp in the Dover Iron Era, May 22, 1886.

A Baggage Master Coupled.

James L. Stewart:

DL&W

Stewart's obituary

Rockaway Record, July 21, 1927

Joseph Steventon:

Mr. Steventon was born in Pennsylvania c. 1838. During the Civil War, he was a Bugler with Co. B, 1st NJ Lt. Art; serving from September, 1861 to September, 1864 per the Veterans census of 1890.

BOONTON. An effort was made last Thursday night to break into the station of the the Lackawanna Railroad. A pane of glass in a window in the baggage-room had been cut out, but the thief was evidently frightened away by Night Watchman Joseph Steventon.

Rockaway Record, May 24, 1900

Peter E. Stryker:

Stryker's obituary

Rockaway Record, March 31, 1931

Frank Studley

Brakeman, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Jeremiah Sullivan:

Sullivan's obituary

Dover Iron Era, March 4, 1904

Timothy F. Sullivan:

Born in Ireland, c. 1847, in 1880 Mr. Sullivan works on railroad track and is a resident of Hanover.

James Swain:

Son of a canaler, John Swaine. John was born Ireland, c. 1815, he is a Canaler in 1850, living in Randolph. In 1860, John remains a canaler, living in Rockaway Township. By 1880, John ”Swayne” is living in Dover. His occupation is Laborer and he was suffering a broken leg. Living in the house of his son, James, it appears that “canaling” did not survive the next Swain generation; James is a brakeman on the railroad.

Thomas Sweeney:

Sweeney's obituary

Dover Iron Era, March 3, 1893

T

Margaret Tobin:

Miss Margaret Tobin, of Church street, has tkane a position with the Lackawanna Railroad at Secaucus.

Boonton Weekly Bulletin, May 23, 1918

William H. Totten:

Born United States c. 1855. Resided in Mendham. Mr. Totten worked as a Railroad Brakeman until his death 0n December 7, 1883.

Alfred Treadway:

Born New York, c. 1851, Alfred is a railroad fireman living in Chester Township. He resides with his father and brother-also railroad employees.

William Treadway:

Born England around 1815, Mr. Treadway serves as the Station Agent in Chester Township.

William Treadway, Jr.:

Born 1856, New Jersey, William, Jr. worked as a railroad clerk.

John T. Trowbridge:

Born c. 1845, a native of New Jersey, Mr. Trowbridge served as the Mail Agent for the DL&W Railroad in 1880. He resides in Boonton.

Elias Tucker: Civil War veteran

Born c. 1834, he was a long-time resident of Boonton Township. In 1870, he is a Railroad laborer. According to his pension filing, he served with 2nd NJ Bat. B.

Michael Truilo:

Thank you, Mr. Frank Truilo, for providing images of his father, Michael and uncle, Salvadore. The Truilo brothers began working on the railroads after their service in WWII- Michael on the Lackawanna and Salvadore on the Eire.

The Lackawanna - Help for Those Who Help Themselves

Salvadore Truilo:

Salvadore Trulio

Photograph presumed taken in the 1970s

Edward Tucker:

Central Freight Yard

This (Thursday) morning, while coup-ling cars in the Central freight yard here, Edward Tucker was severely squeezed. Fortunately not serious.

Rockaway Record, December 28, 1899

Charie Tyson

Position unknown, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Marvin Tyson

Position unknown, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

V

Alonzo M. Van Derhoof:

Born c. 1865 in New Jersey, he is described as a “Lamp Man, RR” in the 1910, Rockaway Township census. Typical of the time, he was another young man who gave up life on the canal for the railroad. In the 1880 census, Alonzo is “On Canal” under employment.

View Employees of the Morris Canal.

David Van Derhoof:

In the 1880 census, Rockaway Township, he is a laborer on the R.R. Father of Alonzo M.

Wesley Van Derhoof:

In the Rockaway Township census of 1900, Wesley is working as a laborer on the railroad and resides with his widowed mother, Abby. Wesley was born c. 1877, in April.

John H. Van Derveer, Jr.:

Civil War veteran. He served as a First Lt. in the New Jersey’s 15th. In 1880 as a resident of Chester, he serves as a Station Agent. Mr. Van Derveer’s death date and burial place are unknown.

Anthony Van Orden:

Born 1834, in the 1900 census, he is listed as Gate Keeper R.R.

Clarence Van Orden:

Son of Ira and Caroline. In 1900, Clarence is 21 years old, a resident of Rockaway Township and employed as a laborer on the railroad.

George D. Van Orden:

Son of Anthony and Sarah Van Orden, born in December, 1866. In the 1900 census, George is listed as Station Agent for the RR. His brother, Thomas, is listed as a Laborer (RR).

George Herbert Van Orden:

WWI. Born May 10, 1897, the son of Samuel and Mary Van Orden, in Gladstone, New Jersey. The Van Orden families appear to have been long time residents of Denville. George is working for Joseph Ellsworth of Denville at the time of the draft. Surviving the war, George returns to Denville. In 1930, the census indicates he is a WW veteran and is working as a clerk on the Railroad. Mr. Van Orden died January 10, 1969.

View our list of WWI soldiers and sailors.

Robert M. Van Orden:

In the 1900 census, he is listed as Laborer (R.R.).

Thomas Van Orden:

DL&W. In the 1920 census, he is employed as a Signal man on the Railroad. Son of Anthony and Sarah. Robert Van Orden was born in February, 1878.

The Lackawanna Railroad Company have sent out gangs, of men over their road to clean up about their various stations. The gang for hereabouts is composed of Messrs. Robort VanOrden, Ohas. Cisco, Alonzo Vanderhoof and Thomas VauOrden, of Denville.

Rockaway Record, May 24, 1900

Isaac Van Pelt:

Morris & Essex

Issac Van Pelt, an old and popular conductor with the Morris and Essex Railroad, has been unable to do duty for the last six months, and his friends are making up a purse for him.

Dover Iron Era, February 13, 1875.

John R. Vanderhoof:

A notice in the Rockaway Record, November 3, 1910, indicates Mr. Vanderhoof lies ill. He did succumb that same day and was buried in the Rockaway Valley United Methodist Church Cemetery, Boonton Township.

John R. vanderhood, sixth-eight years old, who was a section foreman on the Lackawanna Railroad for thirty years, lies critically ill from pneumonia in his home in Denville.

Theodore Vanderhoof:

DL&W

Vanderhood's obituary

Rockaway Record, February 23, 1928

Francisco “Frank” Volpe:

WWI. Born in Italy, November 25, 1892. He made his home in Netcong, first, working at Hercules Powder, then on the DL&W Railroad in the Round House, Port Morris. Mr. Volpe served as a Private in the 314th Engineers. He returned to Netcong, where he died November 9, 1965 and is buried in Stanhope-Union Cemetery.

View our list of WWI soldiers and sailors.

Volpe at the Port Morris Roundhouse, with a group of railroad workers

Undated image of the Port Morris Roundhouse, from the collection of Scott and Lois Beale.

William Vough:

Born New Jersey, c. 1853, Mr. Vough is a resident of Hanover. In 1880, his employment is “On Rail Road”.

Arthur B. Vreeland

Auditor, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

W

John G. Waddide:

A resident of Boonton, he is a railroad conductor in 1880.

Albert Waer:

Waer was fatally injured at Beavertown on Thursday. He stepped behind the locomotive, thinking it was going forward, but it backed instead, and striking him crushed a hole in his side.

Dover Iron Era, July 29, 1876

Albert Waer, of Denville, the brakeman who was injured on Thursday of last week, died the same day.

Dover Iron Era, August 5, 1876

Patrick Ward:

Patrick Ward, a brakeman on the Dover freight, fell off a box car at Chatham het Monday night, and was severely hurt. He was taken to a hospital in Jersey City.

The Morris County Chronicle, July 2, 1880

Lewis E. Warwick:

Born New Jersey, c. 1853, he is employed as a fireman on locomotive, per the 1880 Boonton census.

Wellar Thomas Wellington:

DL&W

Wellar Thomas Wellington, 96, passed away peacefully at Chase Memorial Nursing Home in New Berlin on March 31, 2020. Born on August 9, 1923, in Rockaway Township, NJ, Wellar was the son of William and Mary (Watters) Wellington. Wellar first worked on the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad before being called upon to serve our country for the US Army during World War II. He served as an MP in the US and Puerto Rico, and in the Pacific Theater in the Philippines and in post-surrender Japan. After being honorably discharged as a Staff Sergeant and returning home, Wellar married his high school sweetheart, Janet Spencer, who predeceased Wellar in 2012. Wellar returned to the D L &W Railroad, and eventually joined the Northeast NJ Carpenter’s Union, of which he was a member for 72 years. He worked in building construction daily, and built many, many homes for family and friends in the North Jersey area as a secondary business. Wellar was also involved in numerous local events and organizations, and volunteered extensively well into his retirement. He also had expertise in the art of stained glass, and many North Jersey churches benefited from his skill. In addition to offering his many talents, Wellar was also a member of American Legion Post 344 for 68 years, as well as Acacia Masonic Lodge No. 20, for 59 years, having served as a Past Master. Wellar is survived by his daughter Nancy Smietana, of Norwich; his son Neil Wellington, of Chicago, IL; grandchildren Jayson (Beth) Smietana, of Las Vegas, NV, Dustin (Jenn) Smietana, of Norwich; four great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandchild. He was predeceased by both of his siblings, W. Robert Wellington of Springfield, MO and Grace W. Carlson, of Randolph, NJ. A graveside service for Wellar will be held at Locust Hill Cemetery, in Dover, NJ, at a later date. Contributions in Wellar’s memory may be made to Waterloo United Methodist Church, PO Box 416, Stanhope, NJ 07874.

Thank you, Mr. Kent Wellington, for providing information for his Uncle Wellar.

Fred H. Wildrick

Wildrick's obituary

The Morris County Chronicle, February 4, 1898

Emmons C. Williams:

DL&W

Emmons C. Williams, a Lackawanna Railroad engineer, died Friday night from pneumonia at his home in Morristown, where his wife was critically ill from the same disease. Mr. Williams was born sixty years qgo In Denville, and had been In the employ of the rail-road forty-five years, having started as a water boy. Within thirty-six hours of the death of her husband, Mrs. Mary Leonora Cook, widow of Emmons C. Williams, died Sunday morning at the home of her son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Philip Jacobs.

The Boonton Weekly Bulletin, May 8, 1919

Fletcher Williams

Superintendent, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

John H. Williams:

John H. Williams died at thihis home on Arch street last Friday morning from general debility. Mr. Wililams was for years employed at the Central railroad round house. The funeral was held on Sunday from his late home. Hopocon Tribe, LORM of Wharton, of which Mr. Williams was a member, and a large designation from Blazing Arrow Tribue, LORM, of this place, attended the funeral in a body.

Dover Iron Era, January 15, 1904

Y

George Young

Brakeman, Morristown & Erie Railroad (now Morristown & Erie Railway).

The line was constructed by the McEwan family to serve their paper mills around Whippany. The railway ran between Morristown and Essex Fells.

Thank you, Mr. Richard J. King, Treasurer of the Tri-State Railway Historical Society

Z

Edward Zoller:

Born in Germany, in 1920, he is listed as a laborer on the railroad.

John Zoller, Sr.:

Mr. Zoller as the son of Edward and was a maintainer for the signal department on the Lackawanna Railroad. WWII veteran.

View our list of those who served in WWII.

Miscellaneous

Central RR

Henry S. Little, who was on Saturday appointed Receiver of the Central Railroad has been in full harmony with the plans for his precedessor, the late Judge Lathrop.

The Morris County Chronicle, March 10, 1882

DL&W

DL&W Treasurer's report

Dover Iron Era, April 13, 1872

"We are having plenty of railroad surveys through our Valley this spring."

Dover Iron Era April 20, 1872

The D. L. & W. telegraph operators have received dispatches from their brother operators in the yellow fever districts in the South, asking aid for their wives and families. We are glad to state there is a hearty response to these sad appeals.

The Morris County Chronicle, September 7, 1878

The D. L. & W. road will build a new and elaborate station at Hopatcong this winter. Lake Hopatcong will no doubt continue to grow in public favor, and last summer's boom bids fair to continue indefinitely. It is in truth a splendid summer resort.

The Morris County Chronicle, November 26, 1887

The D. L. & W. road has put on a train of refrigerator milk cars.

The Morris County Chronicle, June 23, 1888

Steam heating appliances are being put in all the passenger coaches of the D., L. & W. road as rapidly as possible.

The Morris County Chronicle, December 1, 1888

The D. L. & W. R. It. Praying Band, under the leadership of Dr. S. R. Osmun, will hereafter hold their meetings every Fri. day evening, in the building next to D. W. Carr's bakery, on Market street; the room is being fitted up and will be ready next Friday evening.

The Morris County Chronicle, September 27, 1879

Advertisement for 12,000,000 acres of farmland

Dover Iron Era April 5, 1873

The NJ central railroad company has issued tickets in book form at the rate of two cents a mile.

Dover Iron Era, June 7, 1873

Update about a tunnel or bridge between NJ and NY

Dover Iron Era, June 7, 1873

The delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad Company have adopted a change of shade in painting their cars, tho' latter being now a light orange or buff instead of the former dingy green.

Dover Iron Era, September 27, 1873

The Railroad men of the M&E Division will hold a grand ball in Bates' Hall, Morristown, on Tuesday evening.

Dover Iron Era, December 13, 1873

New palaco cars announcement

Dover Iron Era, May 8, 1875

The Longwood Valley Railroad is now graded to a point near Bartleyville and will undoubtedly be completed this year to its connection with the Easten & Amboy Road.

Dover Iron Era, May 22, 1875

The railroad depot at Chatham has been considerably enlarged and improved this week.

Dover Iron Era, July 31, 1875

The Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad company are engaged in extending their double track to Morristown, from the old point a mile east of the place.

Dover Iron Era, July 31, 1875

The depot at New Foundland was broken open last week.

Dover Iron Era, August 14, 1875

...propose putting on another construction train on the Boonton Branch, in order to carry on the work of their steam shovels now in operation.

Dover Iron Era, August 14, 1875

The new tunnel of the D&L Railroad in jersey City will be completed early next spring.

Dover Iron Era, August 28, 1875

Commodore Vanderbilt, the railway king, who died on Thursday evening, was a cousin of Vanderbilt, the old Denmark fisherman, who sells catfish in Dover occasionally...

Dover Iron Era, July 29, 1876

We hasten to correct a grievous statement made by us last week of Mr. Lang Sheadd, the railroad revivalist, which had it been true would convict him of bigamy. The fortunate gentleman was Mr. O.L. Langstroth of Newark. The similarlity of names probably gave rise to the report that it was the former gentleman. We also unintentionally killed old commodore Vanderbilt on the strenght of a telegram that arrive Thursday evening.

Dover Iron Era, August 5, 1876

The Chester Railroad

The Chester railroad hve commenced running a freight and passenger train over the Chester branch and are doing a fair business; they have not erected a depot yet.

Dover Iron Era, August 12, 1876

Established January 2, 1869, A second branch of railroad service opened in 1873, and in 1882 tracks were laid through the center of town.

Green Pond Railroad

The Green Pond Railroad, a road four and one-half miles in length, from the Coppers home to the Midland, was sold on Thursday last at Brown's Hotel...

Dover Iron Era, August 26, 1876

The Hibernia Mine Railroad

Established in 1863, originally the line was horse-drawn and converted to steam in 1868. Incorporators:

Dudley B. Fuller, George T. Cobb, Theodore Wood, George Richards and the Cooper-Hewitt family.

The Hibernia Mine Railroad Company are going to put up an iron bridge in the place of the old wooden one where their road crosses the canal.

The Morris County Chronicle, December 26, 1879

The Hibernia Mine Underground Railroad

The line was a narrow-gauge road that extended for over a mile into the hill at Hibernia passing through the mines on the vein and hauling ore from the mine hoists to the ore dock at the mouth of the tunnel. Here, ore was loaded and moved down to the Hibernia Mine Railroad and on to furnaces in New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

Longwood Valley Railroad

Longwood Valley Railroad

Dover Iron Era, October 30, 1875.

Workmen are engaged in laying a third, or narrow guage rail, on some parts of the railroad....

Dover Iron Era, January 15, 1876.

on the Longwood Valley railroad about two miles of track have been laid from High Bridge...

Dover Iron Era, February 5, 1876.

The new Longwood valley railroad is already carrying more passengers to Schooley's Mountain than the D.L. & W.

Dover Iron Era, July 29, 1876

First passenger train on Longwood Valley rail

Dover Iron Era, August 5, 1876

The track of this road has already been laid into Port Oram...

Dover Iron Era, August 5, 1876

A neat depot has been completed at German Valley for the Longwood valley railroad. Four trains leave that place daily.

Dover Iron Era, August 19, 1876

Midland Railroad

Sleeping coaches on the Midland Railroad

Dover Iron Era, April 1, 1876

Morris & Essex

So much complaint has been made of alleged deficiencies in the train service of the Morris & Essex Division that. Supt. Reasoner has instituted rigid inquiry as to the cause of complaint. We venture to predict, however, that no shortcomings will be found against any of the trainmen, connected with Morristown trains, for the reason that they are al-ways to be found at their posts attending strictly to duty, and are at all times accommodating and courteous to the pa-trons of the road. If there is any defect in the service it is upon trains other than those running to and from Morristown.

The Morris County Chronicle, December 12, 1885

According to the Newark Call, society ladies of Orange are discussing the relative "lovliness" of Mori is & Essex conductors and brakemen, with a preponderance of gushing in favor of the latter, Perhaps these same discriminating ladies are not aware that the Morris & Essex management employs conductors with special reference to their piety and mental culture, while the brakemen are selected with more regard to physical beauty and capacity to wear a stereo-typed smile and a full set of original teeth in assisting passengers on and off the train.

The Morris County Chronicle, December 31, 1887

Morristown & Erie

No. 10 railbus

No. 10 is housed at The Whippany Railway Museum

Red train engine

M&E Railroad ticket between Essex Fells and Montclair

 

M&E Railroad ticket between Morristown and Whippany

M&E Railroad ticket between Verona and Essex Fells

A collection of unsold tickets for the Morristown and Erie Railroad. The line discontinued passenger service in 1928. The Whippany-Morristown one would have been sold to someone wanting a round trip ticket. The others were for one way trips to stations located on the Erie Railroad's Caldwell Branch, which connected to the M&E at Essex Fells. These tickets had two coupons, one for the M&E segment and one for the Erie portion of the trip.

Thank you, Mr. Mike Dodge, Trustee, Whippany Railway Museum.

Mount Hope Mineral Railroad

Established in 1866, incorporators:

Joseph H. Scranton, Selden T. Scranton, J. Couper Lord, William G. Lathrop, Elias M. White, Benjamin G. Clark.

After the Empire Steel and Iron Company acquired the railroad in 1899, passenger service began from Port Oram that ran until 1924. At its peak there were 3 round trips a day and the fare from Wharton to Mount Hope was 12 cents.

Cause for celebration in Chester

Celebration at first High Bridge Railroad train cars

Dover Iron Era, June 24, 1876

On Thursday of this week the people of Chester were quite enthusiastic over the completion of the High Bridge Railroad to the village, the flag was raised on the liberty pole and the firing of salutes during the day told that some great event had happened in our midst.

Dover Iron Era, June 24, 1876

The Lackawanna Railroad machine shops in Scranton are equipping sixteen of the company's locomotives with electric headlines, and several of them were put into service on Monday.

Rockaway Record, January 18, 1900

Uniforms

Uniformed employee, with hat, coat and buttoned vest

Unidentified employee, Morris County Traction Co., image courtesy of Lake Hopatcong Historical Society.

Brakemen and baggagemasters on the D., L. & W. R. R. are grumbling over an order requiring the purchase of new uniforms for the Winter. It is an expense they are ill able to afford ; be-sides, their suits of last Winter are still in good condition. They feel further aggrieved by the fact that the conductors, who receive double their pay, are provided with uniforms at the company's expense. About 150 men are affected by the order.

The Morris County Chronicle, October 29, 1887

The new Lackawanna winter uniforms, which are being made by a New York concern, differ materially from the old ones. The addition of the initials of the company in silver braid to the coat collar is an innovation, and obviates the possibility of Lackawanna employees becoming lost, strayed or stolen in the future.

Rockaway Record, December 28, 1899

It is rumored that the employees of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad at the station will wear uniforms.

Dover Iron Era, April 7, 1899

An order decrees that baggage men and station helpers at Lackawanna stations shall wear corduroy trousers and blue jumper.

Rockaway Record, February 1, 1900

The new rule compelling all employees of the Lackawanna to wear uniforms is crest-log quite some dissatisfaction among the men. It is nevertheless a good departure, for the uniform will serve as a badge of authority and will be recognized by the public as such.

Dover Iron Era, January 4, 1901

Mt. Hope Mineral Railroad

The locomotive 'Leonard Peckitt' of the Mt. hope Mineral Railroad, is being repaired and thoroughly overhauled.

Dover Iron Era, March 6, 1903

A mail service will be installed on Monday on the Mt. Hope Mineral railroad between Wharton and Mt. Hope.

Dover Iron Era, April 3, 1903

The Morris County Traction Co. are carrying green flags. General Manager Claude Weidman hue explained that the road has adopted the standard roles governing electric railroads, acid as the Morris County care no operated on schedule, the cars had been applied with the flags such as are ordinarily teen upon the steam roads.

The Boonton Weekly Bulletin, August 21, 1913

Electrification of the D. L. & W. Railroad.

Rockaway Record, September 27, 1928

New Jersey Central

The new Morris County Railroad has passed under the control of New Jersey Central, and is in charge of Supt. G. L. Bryantt of the High Bridge branch.

The Morris County Chronicle, October 8, 1887

Whippany River Railroad

Whippany River Railroad. Leave Whippany, 7:25am, 12:45pm; saturdays only at 3:45 and 6:30pm; Morristown, 8:45am and 5:10pm; Saturdays only at 2pm and 9pm

The Morris County Chronicle, March 18, 1898

Tuckerton Railroad Co.

Tuckerton Railroad paraphernalia, including round trip tickets and workers loading fish onto a train.

Loading fish at Barnegat Bay, c. 1908.

Thank you, Mr. Bradford Kowhan.